During WW II the Command and General Staff Colleges primary mission was to train large numbers of captains and majors to be staff officers in battalions, brigades, divisions, and corps. To that end, the Army provided copies of documents produced by field units to the College. Operations orders, after action reports, intelligence analyses, logistics appraisals, and similar documents are in the CARL documents collection. Primary focus will be on documenting operations at the tactical and operational levels of warfare.

Even while the First World War was still being fought, the newly-formed Imperial War Museum was asking the public to help it tell the story of the global conflict that shaped the world we live in today.

The museum was formed not as a monument to military glory, but as a record of the toil and sacrifice of those who had served in uniform or worked on the home front.

The vision for this record was that it would be so complete that every individual, man or woman, soldier, sailor, airman and civilian from across Britain and the Commonwealth would find a record of their contribution.

But with millions of people involved, not everyone could be named. Many stories could not be told.

Now, in the digital age, IWM can build the permanent digital memorial to the Lives of the First World War.

By working together during the First World War centenary, we can piece together more than 8 million life stories, share them, and enable IWM to save them for future generations.

It would be an extraordinary achievement if we could do this.

The Digital Atlas of Roman and Medieval Civilization (DARMC) makes freely available on the internet the best available materials for a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) approach to mapping and spatial analysis of the Roman and medieval worlds. DARMC allows innovative spatial and temporal analyses of all aspects of the civilizations of western Eurasia in the first 1500 years of our era, as well as the generation of original maps illustrating differing aspects of ancient and medieval civilization. A work in progress with no claim to definitiveness, it has been built in less than three years by a dedicated team of Harvard undergraduates, graduate students, research scholars and one professor, with some valuable contributions from younger and more senior scholars at other institutions. For more details on who we are, please see the People page.

ARMC contains dozens of data layers in several geodatabases, that is, databases whose data is georeferenced or specified in terms of decimal degrees of latitude and longitude. They should prove useful to students, professional scholars and scientists, as well as to learned amateurs and curious minds of all descriptions. Here one can find the Roman road networks, bridges, aqueducts, the cities and settlements of the empire, Roman military installations, the shrines, mines, and villas that already appeared in the Barrington Atlas and in other similar research tools.

Источник описания:Digital Atlas of Roman and Medieval Civilizations

Chico Historical Geographic Information System (GIS). This analytical tool is designed to provide users an interactive historical research experience using modern mapping technologies. Primary source materials recovered from research repositories across California are presented using a unique interactive platform. The goal of this study is to transform historical documentation into an easily accessible format that can be interpreted across both space and time.

The study area for this project is Chico's oldest residential neighborhood known today as the South Campus Historic District, nominated to the National Register of Historic Places in 1991. The 166 parcels within the 23 blocks of the District are made up predominantly of university student housing, intermingled with a large office building currently occupied by AT&T, a Catholic Church, grade school and a small neighborhood commercial zone. There are 116 properties that are considered contributors to the historic integrity of the District. The neighborhood is 150 years old; the first lots were sold in 1862. The historic period under review in this study is 1862-1960.

 

Источник описания:Chico Historical GIS

The Digital Archive is a resource where students, researchers and specialists can access once-secret documents from governments and organizations all over the world.

Constructed and maintained by the Wilson Center’s History and Public Policy Program, the Digital Archive contains newly declassified historical materials from archives around the world—much of it in translation and including diplomatic cables, high level correspondence, meeting minutes and more. The historical documents presented in the ever-expanding Digital Archive provide fresh, unprecedented insights into recent international history. By making new sources available and easily accessible, the Digital Archive serves to deepen and enrich international scholarship, history education, and public policy debate on important global issues and challenges.

The Digital Archive supports the mission and research aims of three Wilson Center projects:

  • THE COLD WAR INTERNATIONAL HISTORY PROJECT (CWIHP)

    The Cold War International History Project (CWIHP) supports the full and prompt release of historical materials by governments on all sides of the Cold War. It seeks to accelerate the process of integrating new sources, materials and perspectives from the former "Communist bloc" with the historiography of the Cold War which has been written over the past few decades largely by Western scholars reliant on Western archival sources. Contact the project at coldwar@wilsoncenter.org

  • THE NORTH KOREA INTERNATIONAL DOCUMENTATION PROJECT (NKIDP)

    The North Korea International Documentation Project (NKIDP) serves as an informational clearinghouse on North Korea for both the scholarly and policymaking communities by widely disseminating newly declassified documents on the DPRK from its former communist allies as well as other resources that provide valuable insight into the actions and nature of the North Korean state. Contact the project at NKIDP@wilsoncenter.org

  • THE NUCLEAR PROLIFERATION INTERNATIONAL HISTORY PROJECT (NPIHP)

    The Nuclear Proliferation International History Project (NPIHP) is a global network of individuals and institutions engaged in the study of international nuclear history through archival documents, oral history interviews and other empirical sources. Recognizing that today’s toughest nuclear challenges have deep roots in the past, NPIHP seeks to transcend the East vs. West paradigm to work towards an integrated international history of nuclear weapon proliferation. Contact the project atNPIHP@wilsoncenter.org

The Digital Archive is generously supported by the Korea Foundation, the Republic of Korea Ministry of Unification, the Lenfest Foundation, the Leon Levy Foundation, the Blavatnik Family Foundation, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation of New York, and other donors.

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The Houghton Library's distinguished collection of medieval and Renaissance manuscripts represents a significant resource for the study of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance in Western Europe. Assembled through gifts and purchase over the past two centuries, this collection includes works in Latin, Greek, and most of the vernacular languages of Europe that are the primary sources for the study of the literature, art, history, music, philosophy, and theology of the periods.

This Web site provides strategies for searching Houghton's medieval manuscripts as well as links to bibliographies related to these materials that were compiled by the Library. Permission to publish from any manuscript is granted at the discretion of theCurator. See Houghton's Reproductions and Permissions page for more information.

Digitization of Houghton's manuscripts was begun with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities through its grant to the Digital Scriptorium and is being continued with funding from Harvard University's Library Digital Initiative and from the Harvard College Library. As digital versions become available, we will provide links to them from this Web page as well as from the HOLLIS catalog.

The Houghton Library collection of Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts is divided into a number of shelf classifications, including language and subject classifications MSS Dutch, Eng(lish), Fr(ench), Ger(man), Gr(eek), Ital(ian), Judaica, Lat(in), Port(uguese), Span(ish) and Syriac. Please remember that these are both language and subject classifications.  For example, MS Eng 736, Statutes of the Order of the Garter, is written in Latin; MS Gr 23, the tragedies of Euripides, is a Latin translation, and MS Lat 235, a medical, astrological and alchemical miscellany, includes recipes in Middle English. There are also four named collections: MS Riant, Richardson, Typ(ography), and Widener. Inc(unabula) are fifteenth-century printed books included here for their extensive manuscript annotation.

Houghton Library staff are in the process of supplying complete bibliographies for each of the manuscripts in these collections. You can access available bibliographies through this Web page as well as through the HOLLIS record for each individual manuscript.

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The colossal site of Karnak is one of the largest temple complexes in the world, with an incredibly rich architectural, ritual, religious, economic, social and political history. The Amun-Ra precinct, which includes an astonishing number of individual temples, shrines and processional ways, stands as a micro-cosmos of ancient Egypt.

We invite you to experience Karnak – to learn about an ancient site that still resonates today because of its monumental pylons, towering columns, stunning reliefs and architectural marvels. Enter the temple precinct and discover its rich religious, political and architectural history.

The Digital Karnak Project was designed and built at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) under the direction of Dr. Diane Favro (director of the ETC) and Dr. Willeke Wendrich (editor-in-chief of the UCLA Encyclopedia of Egyptology).

To start, choose one of the options above or go directly to the temple complex overview. Click hereto learn more about the Digital Karnak project.

We want everyone—students, teachers, parents, and the general public—to read these milestone documents, consider their meaning, discuss them, and decide which are the most significant and why. This initiative creates a number of ways to do that—through classroom activities and competitions, and votes.

Источник описания:Our Documents

The Internet Ancient History Sourcebook is a companion to the Internet Medieval Sourcebook and the Internet Modern History Sourcebook. The Medieval Sourcebook is both a classroom resource and the largest collection of online medieval texts. The Ancient and Modern Sourcebooks have a different role: since there are already ample online repositories of texts for these periods, the goal here is to provide and organize texts for use in classroom situations. Links to the larger online collections are provided for those who want to explore further. The distinctive feature of the Sourcebooks' layout remains here - the avoidance of images and multiple "clicking" to find texts. Unlike the Medieval and Modern History Sourcebooks, this section of the project did not involve much scanning of new material to begin with. At this stage, however, an increasing number of new etexts are available at this site. The Ancient History Sourcebook also includes links to visual and aural material, since art and archeology are far more important for the periods in question than for later history. The emphasis remains on access to primary source texts for educational purposes.

This site focuses on online texts, which, for the most part, means public domain texts translated more than 75 years ago. In many cases it is these older translations which are used in commercially available sourcebooks. But note that, for classroom use,  in some cases the more modern translations are superior from a pedagogic viewpoint: this is less the case with historiography than with literature. In other words, use online resources well, but don't get carried away!

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The Metropolitan Museum of Art was founded on April 13, 1870, "to be located in the City of New York, for the purpose of establishing and maintaining in said city a Museum and library of art, of encouraging and developing the study of the fine arts, and the application of arts to manufacture and practical life, of advancing the general knowledge of kindred subjects, and, to that end, of furnishing popular instruction."1

This statement of purpose has guided the Museum for more than a century.

The Trustees of The Metropolitan Museum of Art have reaffirmed the statement of purpose and supplemented it with the following statement of mission:

The mission of The Metropolitan Museum of Art is to collect, preserve, study, exhibit, and stimulate appreciation for and advance knowledge of works of art that collectively represent the broadest spectrum of human achievement at the highest level of quality, all in the service of the public and in accordance with the highest professional standards.

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